Beetroot Poori

5 from 2 votes

This crimson-colored Beetroot Poori is a delicious and healthy variation of the classic poori recipe. Try it at home using my easy recipe (vegan).

Beetroot poori served on a plate.
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About Beetroot Poori

Beetroot Poori is an Indian fried puffed bread made using beetroot puree and whole wheat flour. This vibrant red poori can be paired with curries, raita, or pickles.

Due to the addition of beetroot puree, this poori gets a beautiful crimson color, making it look more appealing. Not only does it look colorful on the plate, but it also tastes more delicious and flavorful than the classic poori.

I have cooked and pureed the beetroot to make this recipe, but you can also grate it and knead it in the dough. If you grate it, the texture and color of the poori might be a little different.

This recipe is vegan and can be easily doubled or tripled.

Here are some more variations of poori that you may like

Ingredients

Beetroot poori ingredients.

Flour – Pooris are traditionally made using whole wheat flour (genu ka atta). You can add some all-purpose flour (maida) to make them crispier.

Sooji – Fine semolina (sooji) makes these poories slightly crispy.

Beetroot – It is the star ingredient of this recipe, which makes the poori different from others.

Oil – Use any neutral-flavored cooking oil to fry the beetroot pooris. Some options include vegetable oil, sunflower oil, canola oil, and light olive oil.

Others – You will also need salt, water, and granulated white sugar.

I like adding a little sugar for that little hint of sweetness and the beautiful color it lends to the fried poori. Try it!

How To Make Beetroot Poori

Cook The Beetroot

Wash the beetroot and chop off a 1-inch piece from the top and the bottom. Peel them using a vegetable peeler and cut them into small pieces using a sharp knife.

Note – Beetroot leaves color on everything it comes in contact with. So, take care of your clothes, fingers, and utensils. Use an old chopping board to chop it.

Heat 2 cups of water in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat.

Water boiling in a pan.

Once the water comes to a boil, add 1 cup of chopped beetroot and stir gently.

Beetroot added to the pan.

Cover the pan with a lid and cook until they are tender (10-12 minutes).

Pan covered with a lid.

Note – You can also pressure cook the beetroot for 2 whistles on high heat. You can also cook pressure cook them in an instant pot for 2 minutes at high pressure.

Remove the pan from the heat and strain the water using a fine-mesh strainer.

Straining the beetroot.

Reserve the water. We will use it later to knead the dough.

Resered water.

Puree The Beetroot

Cool the beetroot for 5 minutes.

Add the cooked beetroot and ¼ cup water (from the reserve) to the small jar of a blender and blend to make a smooth paste.

Beetroot and some water added to a blender.
Smooth puree made.

Make The Dough

Add

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • beetroot puree
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon granulated white sugar
  • 2 teaspoon fine semolina

to a large mixing bowl (or parat) and mix everything well using your fingers.

Flour, beet puree, semolina, salt and sugar added to a large bowl.

Add little water (from the reserve, approx 2-3 tbsp) and knead to make a stiff but smooth dough.

The quantity of the water will depend on the quality of the flour. Do not add much water at once; otherwise, the dough can become sticky.

Note – The consistency of the dough is very important in making a good puffed-up poorie. It should be tighter than the regular roti dough. If the dough is not smooth and has cracks on it, the poories will not fluff up.

Adding water to the dough.
Smooth and stiff dough made.

Cover the dough with a moist cloth and keep aside for 15 minutes.

Dough covered with a cloth.

Roll The Dough

Knead the dough again for 10-12 seconds and then divide it into 18-20 small lime-sized balls.

Small dough ball.

Take a ball and apply a few drops of oil to it. Roll it into a 4-inch disc using a rolling pin.

Rolled poori.

Do not roll the poori too thin; it should be ⅛th of an inch thick.

Roll 4-5 poori and line them on a large plate in a single layer.

Note – Keep the remaining balls covered with a cloth to prevent them from drying.

Fry The Poori

Heat 3-4 cups of neutral-flavored cooking oil for frying in a pan over medium-high heat.

To check if the oil is hot enough to fry the poories, drop a small pinch of dough in the oil. If it rises immediately, it means the oil is hot enough.

Once the oil is hot, slip a rolled poori gently in the hot oil from the side of the pan.

Note – To make puffed-up poori, the temperature of the oil is critical. The oil should be very hot once you slip the poori into it.

Press the poori gently using a perforated ladle and fry till poori puffs up.

Flip and fry from the other side for 3 to 4 seconds.

Drain the beetroot poori on a plate lined with a kitchen tissue. Fry all the rolled poori in the same manner.

Ready beetroot poori.

Now roll the next batch and fry them as well.

Note – When rolling the next batch of poori, reduce the heat of the oil pan to low. When all the poori are rolled, increase the heat to high and let the oil become hot again before slipping in the poories.

Serve hot with curry, pickle, or raita.

Pro Tips By Neha

You can knead the dough softer and use it to make beetroot roti.

Never use dry flour to roll the poori. It will burn while frying and make the oil black and unusable.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I use canned beetroot puree to make beetroot pooris?

Yes, you can use canned beetroot puree to make beetroot pooris. However, it’s best to check the label and ensure no additives or preservatives in the puree.

Are beetroot poori healthy?

Beetroot pooris are a healthier version of regular pooris as they contain the goodness of beetroot. However, they are still fried and high in calories, so it’s best to enjoy them in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Serving Suggestions

Serve it with rasedar aloo, Bhandare Wale Aloo Ki Sabzi, Hing Jeera Aloo, or any curry you like with a flavorful raita and mirch ka achaar.

This poori can also be served with Punjabi Chole, Sukha Kala Chana, or other similar curries. This poori is versatile and will taste great with almost every curry, sabzi, or dal.

They are also perfect for packing in your or your kid’s lunch box.

Storage Suggestions

I suggest you make it fresh and serve it, as they leave their crispiness and flakiness after a moment. But if you are making it for your travel, wrap them in foil. Depending on the climate, they will last up to 2 days at room temperature.

You can even wrap them in foil and store them in the fridge for 2 to 3 days. Heat it on the tawa or microwave before serving.

You can also store the beetroot poori dough in an air-tight container for 3 to 4 days. Make hot pooris out of it and serve immediately.

You can also freeze the dough. Wrap the dough tightly in plastic wrap or an airtight container and freeze for up to a month. Thaw the dough in the refrigerator before using it.

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This crimson-colored beetroot poori is a delicious and healthy variation of the classic poori recipe. Try it at home using my easy recipe.
5 from 2 votes

Beetroot Poori Recipe

This crimson-colored Beetroot Poori is a delicious and healthy variation of the classic poori recipe. Try it at home using my easy recipe.
Prep: 5 minutes
Cook: 25 minutes
Total: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 people

Ingredients 

  • 1 cup peeled and chopped beetroot
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour (gehu ka atta)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons fine semolina (sooji)
  • 1 teaspoon granulated white sugar
  • any neutral flavored cooking oil (for frying)
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Instructions 

Cook The Beetroot

  • Wash the beetroot and chop off a 1-inch piece from the top and the bottom. Peel them using a vegetable peeler and cut them into small pieces using a sharp knife.
  • Note – Beetroot leaves color on everything it comes in contact with. So take care of your cloths, fingers, and utensils. Use an old chopping board to chop it.
  • Heat 2 cups of water in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat.
  • Once the water comes to a boil, add beetroot and stir gently.
  • Cover the pan with a lid and cook until they are tender (10-12 minutes).
  • Note – You can also pressure cook the beetroot for 2 whistles on high heat. You can also cook pressure cook them in an instant pot for 2 minutes at high pressure.
  • Remove the pan from the heat and strain the water using a fine-mesh strainer.
  • Reserve the water. We will use it later to knead the dough.

Puree The Beetroot

  • Cool the beetroot for 5 minutes.
  • Add the cooked beetroot and ¼ cup water (from the reserve) to the small jar of a blender and blend to make a smooth paste.

Make The Dough

  • Add whole wheat flour, beetroot puree, salt, sugar, and, sooji to a large mixing bowl (or parat) and mix everything well using your fingers.
  • Add a little water (from the reserve, approx 2-3 tbsp) and knead to make a stiff dough.
  • The quantity of the water will depend on the quality of the flour. Do not add a lot of water at one go; otherwise, the dough can become sticky.
  • Note – The consistency of the dough is very important in making a good puffed-up poorie. It should be tighter than the regular roti dough. If the dough is not smooth and has cracks on it, the poories will not fluff up.
  • Cover the dough with a moist cloth and keep aside for 15 minutes.

Roll The Dough

  • Knead the dough again for 10-12 seconds and then divide it into 18-20 small lime-sized balls.
  • Take a ball and apply a few drops of oil to it. Roll it into a 4-inch disc using a rolling pin.
  • Do not roll the poori too thin, it should be ⅛th of an inch thick.
  • Roll 4-5 poori and line them on a large plate in a single layer.
  • Note – Keep the remaining balls covered with a cloth to prevent them from drying.

Fry The Poori

  • Heat 3-4 cups of oil for frying in a pan over medium-high heat.
  • To check if the oil is hot enough to fry the poories, drop a small pinch of dough in the oil. If it rises immediately, it means the oil is hot enough.
  • Once the oil is hot, slip a rolled poori gently in the hot oil from the side of the pan.
  • Note – To make puffed-up poori, the temperature of the oil is very important. The oil should be very hot once you slip the poori into it.
  • Press the poori gently using a perforated ladle and fry till poori puffs up.
  • Flip and fry from the other side for 3 to 4 seconds.
  • Drain the beetroot poori on a plate lined with a kitchen tissue. Fry all the rolled poori in the same manner.
  • Now roll the next batch and fry them as well.
  • Note – When rolling the next batch of poori, reduce the heat of the oil pan to low. When all the poori are rolled, increase the heat to high and let the oil become hot again before slipping in the poories.
  • Serve hot with curry, pickle, or raita.

Video

YouTube video

Notes

You can grate the beetroot and knead in the dough too. If you grate it, the texture and color of the poori might be a little different.

Nutrition

Calories: 240kcal, Carbohydrates: 51g, Protein: 9g, Fat: 2g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 318mg, Potassium: 338mg, Fiber: 8g, Sugar: 4g, Vitamin A: 17IU, Vitamin C: 2mg, Calcium: 27mg, Iron: 3mg
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